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Unread postby Shagohod » 24 Jan 2013 15:06

http://x-surface.tumblr.com/

Dude makes up fake news item to show how bogus videogame journalists are. Those goons jump on it like a moth to a flame.
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Unread postby icycalm » 24 Jan 2013 15:27

And why shouldn't they? I'd jump on it too if I were them. How the fuck are you supposed to "fact-check" a rumor? This is Aspergers-talk. Everyone who is whining about lack of "fact-checking" is an Aspergers patient who's spent his whole life inside his room and lacks the mental faculties to sit down for a fucking second and ask himself HOW ON FUCKING EARTH is one supposed to "fact-check" a rumor WHEN THE FUCKING COMPANIES INVOLVED WILL NOT COMMENT ON THEM! And we are back to mind-reading and superspies again. I mean FOR THE LOVE OF FUCKING GOD YOU FUCKING 4CHAN-POSTING ASPIES! LEAVE YOUR FUCKING ROOMS EVEN FOR HALF A FUCKING HOUR A DAY FOR CHRISTSAKE!

If we banned the reporting of rumors because they are not "fact-checkable" we would essentially ban 90% of all the scoops ever. And 90% of them, or thereabouts, tend to be true anyway. So what the fuck is the problem here? Yes, if we had nothing better to do with our lives than send fake rumors to Kotaku all day that 90% figure would fall, BUT WHY THEY FUCK WOULD WE POSSIBLY WANT TO DO THAT? As for the aspie claiming that "the games industry is the only one I can think of that will quite happily publish guesswork as news", this is only because the games industry is THE ONLY INDUSTRY HE CAN THINK OF, PERIOD. Seriously. He's this much of a shut-in and a retard, and you are too for giving him the attention which is obviously the sole reason for his shenanigans.

The problem with videogame journalism is not the reporting on of rumors or the lack of "fact-checking". The problem is all the things I have explained in my two articles, and at the bottom of it all the problem is that it is simply journalism, as I am explaining in my third, and final, article on the subject.
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Unread postby icycalm » 24 Jan 2013 16:08

I mean, it's called a "rumor" precisely because there are no facts for christsake! If there were facts it'd be called fact duh!
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Unread postby icycalm » 24 Jan 2013 16:28

I mean, the only fact here is that there is a rumor. This is a fact, and it can indeed be checked. Look at all the sites: they are repeating the rumor. Hence the rumor exists, is a fact. But the CONTENT of the rumor? How could that be fact if it is only a rumor? It will become fact if and when it ceases to be rumor.

It boggles the mind how I am the only person in the world who can debunk this junk.
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Unread postby icycalm » 02 Nov 2013 18:34

Videogame writing you would pay for – what do you want?
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=707985

FryHole wrote:Welcome to the world of media in 2013, where top ten lists get traffic, so websites have to do them, because readers won't pay for content. If you have a solution to that problem, I'm all ears.


XANDER CAGE wrote:What I really would want to pay for, though, is long-form video game criticism. Like, actual critical analysis, like films and literature gets. The problem is, I don't really think there's anyone really visible right now who I'd pay to get that kind of thing from.


In other words, he would pay for something which he is not genetically capable of recognizing when he sees it. In other words, he won't pay for anything, just like everyone else who plays videogames with the exception of this site's subscribers.
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Unread postby icycalm » 07 Nov 2013 02:36

Why does the gaming press not respect the gaming public?
http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=710592

bishopcruz wrote:This is about more than Sessler though. Any critic or reporter needs an audience. So why is it that so many feel that they can just insult their audience and get away with it?


Because you are not their customers. Their customers are those who are paying their bills. So the bill-payers get respect and you get hypocrisy, lies and contempt. It's not that hard to grasp, really.
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Unread postby icycalm » 08 Sep 2014 13:31

Awesome article: http://www.slate.com/articles/technolog ... _they.html

David Auerbach wrote:Maybe gamers don’t trust their press as much as they trust the enthusiasts because the press doesn’t seem as engaged with the games themselves. Compared with the enthusiasts, the journalists’ hearts aren’t in it. This isn’t true for criticism of other art forms. Sure, there are always hack writers, but Pauline Kael didn’t have to put together five hype-building posts about Destiny for every thoughtful review she wrote. Gaming journalists are caught between capitalist reality and their own frustrated aspirations to be serious cultural critics. But they cannot solve their problems by preaching about the death of their audience. That audience is dying only in that it is leaving them, a process the journalists have evidently decided to accelerate. Game journalists are rage-quitting their meal ticket.


His points are more or less made in the two Videogame News Racket articles and On New Games Journalism. The new development here is this:

David Auerbach wrote:Game companies and developers are now reaching out directly to quasi-amateur enthusiasts as a better way to build their brands, both because the gamers are more influential than the gaming journalists, and because these enthusiasts have far better relationships with their audiences than gaming journalists do. (Admittedly, most anyone does.) This week, Nintendo’s Shigeru Miyamoto signaled a focus on hard-core gamers, and Nintendo has already been shutting out the video game press for years. As Gamasutra’s Keza MacDonald wrote in June, the increasingly direct relationship between gamers and game companies has “removed what used to be [game journalism’s] function: to tell people about games.” Another Gamasutra article cited game developers saying that YouTube coverage had far more impact than all website coverage combined.


This is a step in the right direction.
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Unread postby icycalm » 28 May 2015 20:25

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Unread postby icycalm » 28 Jun 2017 11:34

http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread. ... t242026939

Nirolak wrote:This kind of stuff makes more sense when you understand that most gaming websites are treading water financially in the YouTube/Streamer era.

If you know that putting up an article about Dirt 4 is going to get you 4000 clicks, but comparing it to Dark Souls will instead get you 7000 clicks, you do the latter.

This is also why gaming sites now frequently:
- Have a ton of really bad op-eds meant to incite as many people as possible.
- Use terrible clickbait titles that don't give you any actual information ("Release date for game announced" when the date could have went in the title) or generate intrigue where there is none ("You won't believe what developer said about beautiful new Spider-Man game" -> "There is web swinging in the game.")
- Cover things that aren't games as much as possible, sometimes to the point that they have less game news than non-game news.
- Or in the newest trend, just search the title of a game on Twitter and repost the dumbest tweets you can find under a title "Gamers in outrage over ______".

Publishers have largely taken their marketing direct to consumer (and/or through YouTube/Twitch people, who have much more loyal followings and a notably stronger influence with their fan base), which coupled with the huge rate of adblock among the gaming audience, has left an industry in crisis. Now, a lot of these sites did this to themselves by not building loyal audiences with high grade, well targeted content earlier, but this is how we got to where we are today.

That said, there's also a degree to which mimicry simply happens among people who look up to these bigger sites and go "Oh, I guess this is what I'm supposed to be doing." if you look at some z-tier blogs where it's not entirely clear the staff is even paid.
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